Spring 2022 Course Descriptions

Two-Semester First-Year Writing Courses

ENWR 1506 - Writing and Critical Inquiry: The Stretch Sequence

Offers a two-semester approach to the First Writing Requirement. This sequence allows students to take more time, in smaller sections and with support from the Writing Center, practicing and reinforcing the activities that are central to the first-year writing course. Like ENWR 1510, ENWR 1505-06 approaches writing as a way of generating, representing, and reflecting on critical inquiry. Students contribute to an academic conversation about a specific subject of inquiry and learn to position their ideas and research in relation to the ideas and research of others.  Instructors place student writing at the center of course, encourage students to think on the page, and prepare them to reflect on contemporary forms of expression.  Students read and respond to each other’s writing in class regularly, and they engage in thoughtful reflection on their own rhetorical choices as well as those of peers and published writers.  Additionally, the course requires students to give an oral presentation on their research and to assemble a digital portfolio of their writing.

001 - Writing & Community Engagement  - Collaborative Inquiry Into Race & Identity
TR 12:30PM-01:45PM (New Cabell 042)
Kate Kostelnik

002 - Writing about Culture/Society - Advertising Culture
MW 02:00PM-03:15PM (New Cabell 038)
Claire Chantell

003 - Writing about Culture/Society - Advertising Culture
MW 03:30PM-04:45PM (New Cabell 038)
Claire Chantell

004 - Writing about Culture/Society - Writing & Concepts of Creativity
MWF 12:00PM-12:50PM (New Cabell 042)
Patricia Sullivan

005 - Writing about Culture/Society - Writing & Concepts of Creativity
MWF 01:00PM-01:50PM (New Cabell 042)
Patricia Sullivan

006 - Writing about Culture/Society - Contemporary Pop Culture
TR 11:00AM-12:15PM (New Cabell 038)
David Coyoca

007 - Writing & Community Engagement - Collaborative Inquiry Into Race & Identity
TR 11:00AM-12:15PM (New Cabell 042)
Kate Kostelnik

008 - Writing about Culture/Society - The Art of Protest; how protest music, film and literature influence society
TR 02:00PM-03:15PM (New Cabell 038)
Amber McBride

009 - Writing about Culture/Society - The Art of Protest; how protest music, film and literature influence society
TR 03:30PM-04:45PM (New Cabell 038)
Amber McBride

Single-Semester First-Year Writing Courses

ENWR 1510 - Writing and Critical Inquiry (71 sections)

Approaches writing as a way of generating, representing, and reflecting on critical inquiry. Students contribute to an academic conversation about a specific subject of inquiry and learn to position their ideas and research in relation to the ideas and research of others.  Instructors place student writing at the center of course, encourage students to think on the page, and prepare them to reflect on contemporary forms of expression.  Students read and respond to each other’s writing in class regularly, and they engage in thoughtful reflection on their own rhetorical choices as well as those of peers and published writers.  Additionally, the course requires students to give an oral presentation on their research and to assemble a digital portfolio of their writing.

001 - Writing & Community Engagement - Writing Charlottesville
TR 02:00PM-03:15PM (Bryan 330)
Kevin Smith

002 - Writing about Culture/Society - Writing Utopia
TR 08:00AM-09:15AM (Shannon 109)
Emelye Keyser

For hundreds of years, people have been writing utopias to imagine worlds that prioritize different ideologies: from communism to feminism, environmentalism, equality, equity, and Christianity. This course will be dedicated to exploring some questions that arise in reading utopias. Has anyone ever imagined a utopia that works for everyone? What place is there for progress in a utopia? How does utopian thinking affect how we as political people operate in this imperfect world? This course will have you reading texts from the 16th century through to just a few years go. We'll mainly practice academic writing, but we'll also get creative with genre and audience as we think about what it would take to write our own utopias.

003 - Writing & Community Engagement - Writing About Work
TR 03:30PM-04:45PM (Bryan 310)
Piers Gelly

004 - Writing about the Arts - Writing the Aesthetic Experience
MWF 12:00PM-12:50PM (Bryan 310)
Kaelin Foody

005 - Writing about the Arts 
TR 03:30PM-04:45PM (New Cabell 044)
Charity Fowler

006 - Writing & Community Engagement - Your Fave is Problematic: Pop-Culture Criticism in the 21st Century
TR 05:00PM-06:15PM (Bryan 312)
Vallaire Wallace

007 - Writing about the Arts - Writing about Dreams
MWF 09:00AM-09:50AM (Bryan 310)
Austin Benson

008 - Writing & Community Engagement - D.I.Y. Writing, Art, and Community
MWF 11:00AM-11:50AM (Bryan 310)
Michelle Gottschlich

D.I.Y. (or “Do It Yourself”) as it's known today, has existed for nearly a century. Taking hold in the post-war American suburbs, it has shifted dramatically through time—entering the iconoclastic punk era, Etsy mood boards, Soundcloud rap, Tik Tok videos, and more. What do these materials, scenes, makers, and movements have in common? Rhetorically rich and culturally fraught, studying D.I.Y. will get us thinking about how identities & ideas are baked into the “language” of things. Through reading, writing, analysis, and discussion, we will carefully reverse-bake these out to see what we really make of them. We’ll also practice what we study as artists and writers, and chat with visiting artists and writers about their craft. But perhaps most importantly, we’ll learn from D.I.Y. communities how to build supportive, inclusive, and non-judgmental creative spaces in which we can share our work (and ourselves) with one another.

Throughout the semester, we may ponder these questions: How do we express ourselves and our ideas through the things we make in writing, art, music, design, media, fashion, movement...? 
How do we communicate and connect with one another? What role does writing and publishing play in this? How did they make that? Can I make that?

009 - Writing about Identities -
MWF 12:00PM-12:50PM (Bryan 332)
Rebecca Thomas

010 - Writing about Culture/Society - Writing about Food
TR 05:00PM-06:15PM (Bryan 330)
Keith Driver

011 - Writing about Culture/Society - Writing About Memory
MWF 03:00PM-03:50PM (New Cabell 211)
DeVan Ard

012 - Writing about Culture/Society - Writing Environments
MWF 12:00PM-12:50PM (Bryan 312)
John T. Casteen IV

013 - Writing as Multilingual Writers
MWF 12:00PM-12:50PM (Bryan 334)
Matthias Maunsell

014 - Writing about Culture/Society - Writing About Memory
MWF 01:00PM-01:50PM (Bryan 310)
DeVan Ard

015 - Writing about the Arts - Writing about Food
TR 03:30PM-04:45PM (Bryan 332)
Casey Ireland

016 - Writing about Culture/Society - Assessing Risk, Reward, Perfomance
MWF 10:00AM-10:50AM (Bryan 332)
Jon D'Errico

017 - Writing about Culture/Society - Dropouts 
MW 05:00PM-06:15PM (New Cabell 411)
Jordan Burke

018 - Writing about Culture/Society - Dropouts
MW 03:30PM-04:45PM (New Cabell 411)
Jordan Burke

019 - Writing & Community Engagement - D.I.Y. Writing, Art, and Community
MWF 10:00AM-10:50AM (Bryan 310)
Michelle Gottschlich

D.I.Y. (or “Do It Yourself”) as it's known today, has existed for nearly a century. Taking hold in the post-war American suburbs, it has shifted dramatically through time—entering the iconoclastic punk era, Etsy mood boards, Soundcloud rap, Tik Tok videos, and more. What do these materials, scenes, makers, and movements have in common? Rhetorically rich and culturally fraught, studying D.I.Y. will get us thinking about how identities & ideas are baked into the “language” of things. Through reading, writing, analysis, and discussion, we will carefully reverse-bake these out to see what we really make of them. We’ll also practice what we study as artists and writers, and chat with visiting artists and writers about their craft. But perhaps most importantly, we’ll learn from D.I.Y. communities how to build supportive, inclusive, and non-judgmental creative spaces in which we can share our work (and ourselves) with one another.

Throughout the semester, we may ponder these questions: How do we express ourselves and our ideas through the things we make in writing, art, music, design, media, fashion, movement...? 
How do we communicate and connect with one another? What role does writing and publishing play in this? How did they make that? Can I make that?

020 - Writing & Community Engagement - Writing About Work
TR 05:00PM-06:15PM (Bryan 310)
Piers Gelly

021 - Writing about Culture/Society - Women, Romance, and Writing
MW 05:00PM-06:15PM (Bryan 330)
Samantha Wallace

022 - Writing & Community Engagement - The Contemplative Pause
MW 03:30PM-04:45PM (Bryan 310)
devin donovan

023 - Writing about Culture/Society - Attention, Distraction, and the World Beyond Your Head
MW 02:00PM-03:15PM (Bryan 312)
Annie Thompson

024 - Writing & Community Engagement - Writing as Storytelling
MWF 09:00AM-09:50AM (Bryan 332)
Molly Kluever

025 - Writing about the Arts - Story(re)telling: Adaptation & Reimagining of Enduring Narratives
TR 12:30PM-01:45PM (Bryan 332)
Gahl Pratt Pardes

026 - Writing about the Arts - Writing about Television
TR 12:30PM-01:45PM (Bryan 310)
Cristina Griffin

In this class, we will practice critical inquiry and hone our writing skills by engaging with one of the most familiar aesthetic forms of the twentieth and twenty-first centuries: the television show. As we read, watch, discuss, and write about television together, our goal will be to approach this familiar form with a fresh perspective, not taking anything about television for granted. How do the formal elements of television shows—their genres, storytelling capacities, narrative features, and serial formats—build compelling worlds? How can we approach these tv worlds analytically while also valuing the emotional impact of television? How do television shows critique and generate culture? How do shows build arguments about experiences of race, gender, sexuality, and class? Over the course of the semester, we will read scripts that turned into episodes, read critical writing about television, and of course we will also watch a variety of tv episodes. But more than anything, we will write about television: we will build up our capacity to analyze television and then turn that inquiring perspective onto our own writing. If television shows build worlds out of words—and if those worlds can and do have a giant impact, for better or worse, on the world we live in—then we will take seriously how we can develop our own writing and re-approach our practices of world-building and meaning-making through our words.

027 - Writing & Community Engagement - Beauty and Thievery in the Modern Museum
TR 09:30AM-10:45AM (Shannon 111)
Rachel Kravetz

028 - Writing about Culture/Society - Attention, Distraction, and the World Beyond Your Head
MW 05:00PM-06:15PM (Bryan 312)
Annie Thompson

029 - Writing about Culture/Society - The Grass Class: Writing Between the Human and Nonhuman
MW 05:00PM-06:15PM (Bryan 310)
Hannah Dierdorff

030 - Writing about the Arts - Writing about Film
MWF 11:00AM-11:50AM (New Cabell 415)
Marissa Jane Kessenich

031 - Writing about Culture/Society - Assessing Risk, Reward, Perfomance
MWF 11:00AM-11:50AM (Bryan 332)
Jon D'Errico

032 - Writing about Culture/Society - Women, Romance, and Writing
MW 03:30PM-04:45PM (Bryan 330)
Samantha Wallace

033 - Writing about Science & Tech - 
TR 12:30PM-01:45PM (Bryan 312)
Cory Shaman

034 - Writing about Culture/Society -
TR 11:00AM-12:15PM (Bryan 310)
Lindgren Johnson

035 - Writing about Identities - Write Your Way: Owning Your Process, Perspective, and Personality
MWF 11:00AM-11:50AM (New Cabell 207)
Janice Murray

036 - Writing about Culture/Society - The Almighty Dollar: The Culture of Money, Mobility & the American Dream
TR 03:30PM-04:45PM (Bryan 334)
Jessica Walker

037 - Writing about Science & Tech -
TR 09:30AM-10:45AM (Bryan 330)
Cory Shaman

039 - Writing about Culture/Society - Trash Talk
TR 05:00PM-06:15PM (Bryan 334)
Kyle Marbut

040 - Writing about the Arts - Writing about Food
TR 05:00PM-06:15PM (Bryan 332)
Casey Ireland

041 - Writing about the Arts - Points of View
TR 08:00AM-09:15AM (Bryan 332)
Matthew Davis

This course is intended to help you develop writing skills that will help you succeed while you are at UVA and also after you graduate. The theme for this section will be "points of view" in fiction. We will read and write about short stories, with a special focus on different ways of narrating a story. The fiction readings will be taken from a classic but rather unusual anthology, Points of View, in which the stories are classified according to the mode of narration used in the story. One section of the anthology contains "interior monologues," in which we seem to be inside the main character's head, hearing his or her thoughts in live time; another section contains "dramatic monologues,"in which we seem to overhear the narrator speaking aloud to another character; a third, letters written by the characters; a fourth, diary entries; and so on. We will look at eleven modes of narration and study two examples of most modes, reading about twenty stories in all.

You will complete six substantial written assignments -- three narratives and three argumentative essays. For the narratives, you will be asked to use one of the modes of narration we have studied to tell a story. The narratives should be appx. 3-6 pages in length. (Longer is not necessarily better.) Each narrative will be written once, without opportunity for revision. For the argumentative essays, you will be asked to write an essay with a thesis and supporting textual evidence. Each essay should be appx. 4-7 pages long, but quality of writing, thinking, and argumentation are more important than length. The argumentative essays will be drafted, workshopped, and revised. In addition, you will learn some principles of composition, complete some exercises related to writing, and complete a library assignment.

042 - Writing about Culture/Society - Trash Talk
TR 03:30PM-04:45PM (Bryan 330)
Kyle Marbut

043 - Writing about Science & Tech - Humans, Animals, and Machines
TR 08:00AM-09:15AM (Bryan 334)
Roberto Rodriguez

044 - Multilingual Writers -
MWF 11:00AM-11:50AM (Bryan 334)
Matthias Maunsell

045 - Writing about Identities - Music, Writing, Identity
MW 02:00PM-03:15PM (Bryan 332)
Steph Ceraso

Everyone’s life has a soundtrack. We make playlists for different moods, activities, and events. We associate particular songs with moments in our personal and cultural histories. We memorize lyrics and repeat them like mantras. We sing loudly (usually off key) in our showers and cars. We love songs. We hate songs. We love to hate songs. Music is a powerful force in our everyday lives.

This writing-intensive seminar will focus on the connection between music and identity. We will explore a wide range of music and writing about music, examining questions such as: How does music influence the ways we make sense of our lives? In what ways do our identities (race, gender, class, ethnicity, sexuality, etc.) inform our musical tastes and distastes? What is the relationship between music and writing? Why does music matter? In addition to reading and writing about music, students in this class will learn to write with music. In other words, you will be incorporating music into some of the course projects, such as an autobiographical playlist and a podcast about the development of musical tastes. No previous experience with digital audio editing is necessary.

046 - Writing & Community Engagement - Rewriting Race, Place, & History at UVA
TR 03:30PM-04:45PM (New Cabell 036)
Anastatia Curley

047 - Writing & Community Engagement - Writing Home
MWF 11:00AM-11:50AM (New Cabell 287)
Rachel Retica

048 - Writing about Culture/Society - The Almighty Dollar: The Culture of Money, Mobility & the American Dream
TR 02:00PM-03:15PM (Bryan 334)
Jessica Walker

049 - Writing about Culture/Society - Women, Romance, and Writing
MW 02:00PM-03:15PM (Bryan 330)
Samantha Wallace

050 - Writing about Culture/Society -
TR 08:00AM-09:15AM (Bryan 312)
Derek Cavens

051 - Writing about Culture/Society - Dropouts
MW 02:00PM-03:15PM (New Cabell 411)
Jordan Burke

052 - Writing about Identities -
TR 09:30AM-10:45AM (Bryan 332)
Raisa Tolchinsky

053 - Writing about Culture/Society -
TR 08:00AM-09:15AM (Bryan 330)
Wyatt McNamara

055 - Writing about Culture/Society - Genealogies of Modernity: How the World Became Modern
MWF 09:00AM-09:50AM (Bryan 330)
Daniel Zimmerman

056 - Writing about Culture/Society - Writing about Place
MWF 11:00AM-11:50AM (Shannon 108)
Peyton Davis

057 - Writing about Identities -
MWF 01:00PM-01:50PM (Bryan 332)
Rebecca Thomas

058 - Writing about Culture/Society - The Almighty Dollar: The Culture of Money, Mobility & the American Dream
TR 09:30AM-10:45AM (Bryan 334)
Jessica Walker

059 - Writing about Identities -
MWF 10:00AM-10:50AM (Bryan 330)
Rebecca Thomas

060 - Writing about Identities - Writing about Horror through Identity & Social Justice
TR 09:30AM-10:45AM (Shannon 108)
Seanna Viechweg

061 - Writing about Identities - The Art of Journaling
TR 09:30AM-10:45AM (New Cabell 211)
Hodges Adams

062 - Writing about Culture/Society -
TR 09:30AM-10:45AM (Bryan 310)
Lindgren Johnson

063 - Writing & Community Engagement - Writing Home(s)
MW 06:30PM-07:45PM (Bryan 312)
Nehali Patel

064 - Writing about Culture/Society - Writing the Unlikeable Female Character
MW 06:30PM-07:45PM (Bryan 310)
Palmer Smith

065 - Writing & Community Engagement - Beauty and Thievery in the Modern Museum
TR 02:00PM-03:15PM (New Cabell 056)
Rachel Kravetz

066 - Writing about Culture/Society - Writing Utopia
TR 02:00PM-03:15PM (New Cabell 044)
Emelye Keyser

For hundreds of years, people have been writing utopias to imagine worlds that prioritize different ideologies: from communism to feminism, environmentalism, equality, equity, and Christianity. This course will be dedicated to exploring some questions that arise in reading utopias. Has anyone ever imagined a utopia that works for everyone? What place is there for progress in a utopia? How does utopian thinking affect how we as political people operate in this imperfect world? This course will have you reading texts from the 16th century through to just a few years go. We'll mainly practice academic writing, but we'll also get creative with genre and audience as we think about what it would take to write our own utopias.

068 - Writing about Digital Media - Decoding Digital Writing
TR 06:30PM-07:45PM (Bryan 310)
Samantha Stephens

069 - Writing about the Arts - Story(re)telling: Adaptation & Reimagining of Enduring Narratives
TR 11:00AM-12:15PM (Bryan 332)
Gahl Pratt Pardes

070 - Writing about the Arts - Writing about Food
TR 02:00PM-03:15PM (Bryan 332)
Casey Ireland

071 - Writing about Identities - History and the Self
MW 05:00PM-06:15PM (New Cabell 068)
Jeddie Sophronius

In an ever-changing time, how does history influence our identity? How does our identity change or remain the same? We function in what is called the “composite self.” The language and body language we use when we’re in public are different than the ones we use when we’re with our family and close friends. Then there’s the self that we never show to anyone else. The many layers of history (social, familial, and personal) shape our composite self. This course aims to equip you with the tools and space to explore the many parts of yourself through writing. We will read how various writers write about their history and identity, and we will embark on a journey to explore what constitutes who we are, and how we got there. Students will write three major writing projects throughout the semester.

072 - Writing about Culture/Society - Experimenting with the Essay
TR 05:00PM-06:15PM (New Cabell 115)
Ian Jayne

ENWR 1520 - Writing and Community Engagement (2 sections)

001 - Writing about Food Justice
TR 12:30PM-01:45PM (New Cabell 411)
Kate Stephenson

002 - Writing about Housing Equity
TR 02:00PM-03:15PM (New Cabell 411)
Kate Stephenson

ENWR 2510 - Advanced Writing Seminar (5 sections)

ENWR 2510-001 - Writing about the Arts 
TR 11:00AM-12:15PM Bryan 330
Charity Fowler

ENWR 2510-002 - Writing about Science & Technology: Visualizing Science

MW 05:00PM-06:15PM Bryan 332
Kenny Fountain

This ENWR 2510 course will focus on writing about science, as we investigate the roles description, observation, and visualization (mental and physical) play in the work of science and the communication of scientific research. To do this, we will read actual scientific research articles as well as essays on the history and rhetoric of scientific practices. The three major writing projects for this course require you to practice some of the analytical and communication skills crucial to engage in academic research and to write for both academic and popular audiences. In completing these three major writing projects, you will have an opportunity to practice your own skills of observation and research, collecting and evaluating evidence, and communicating insights and arguments.

ENWR 2510-003 - Writing about Identities

TR 12:30PM-01:45PM Bryan 334 - Ourselves and Others
James Seitz

ENWR 2510-004 - Writing about Identities: Writing Regret and Repair

TR 11:00AM-12:15PM Bryan 312
Tamika Carey

If the old saying is true and everyone actually makes mistakes, then why are apologies so hard to write and why are some apologies more easily dismissed than others? This section of ENWR 2510 explores these questions about regret and repair from an identity-based perspective to strengthen your methods for writing. Said differently, we will consider how class, race, gender, and other identity markers influence public perceptions of error and impression management. We will also investigate social expectations of how regret should be expressed. In doing so, we will pursue the goal of this course, which is to cultivate and refine your analytical reading techniques, invention processes, composing practices, and strategies for revision and publication. 

ENWR 2510-005 - Writing & Community Engagement - Writing Human/Democratic Rights

M 06:00PM-08:30PM Bryan 334
Stephen Parks

ENWR 2520 - Special Topics in Writing (6 sections)

001 - Writing AI, You, and Me
MW 03:30PM-04:45PM Bryan 312
Patricia Sullivan

How has technology changed the way we talk and write about ourselves as humans? This intermediate writing course explores the language we use to describe, understand, and debate the effects of technological advances on society and on our concepts of the human. We will consider issues such as artificial intelligence (AI) and art, AI and labor, the posthuman, surveillance, among others.  All majors are welcome. No special knowledge is necessary; just bring your sense of curiosity and a willingness to write. As a class, we may read literature, popular nonfiction essays, scholarly research, and watch the occasional science fiction film or scientific documentary. I will invite you to compose a variety of texts -- reflective, analytical, exploratory, argumentative – and conduct some original research. Through class workshops, peer reviews and individual conferences, you will develop your metacognition of your writing processes, explore the rhetorical options available to you, consider the consequences and implications of specific rhetorical strategies, as well as broaden your sense of the resources available to you in and beyond academic contexts. Students will write weekly in short and long forms and have regular opportunity to revise with feedback from peers and professor through peer reviews, workshops, and conferences. This course fulfills the SWR and WE requirement.

002 - History and Culture of Writing at UVA

MWF 12:00PM-12:50PM Bryan 330
Heidi Nobles

The University of Virginia, founded in 1819, began with a rich history of writing and writers; that tradition continues today. But with so many different writing activities taking place across Grounds and across time, we may not fully appreciate what all this culture means.

In this course, you will both research and contribute to the culture of writing at UVA. You’ll have a chance to read the (mostly unpublished) writing of past students and faculty, to see where we’ve come from.

You’ll investigate current writing activities across Grounds, helping put together a puzzle that reveals what and how we’re writing today. And finally, you’ll create your own original writing to add to our university archives, making your mark for future generations to read. Through this hands-on literary adventure, you will gain a holistic sense of UVA's rich writing culture and your place, as well.

003 - SCI & Medical Communications

MWF 01:00PM-01:50PM Bryan 312
Kiera Allison

004 - Writing the Memorial to Enslaved Laborers at UVA​

TR 03:30PM-04:45PM Bryan 312
Kate Kostelnik

In this writing course we’ll contribute to conversations of race and history at UVA through self-designed writing projects. The first part of the course will be an inquiry into the history of enslaved laborers at UVA and how the writers of the Declaration of Independence framed our country—particularly in terms of equality, individual liberty, and the institution of slavery— (texts: Danielle Allen’s Our Declaration, Sullivan’s Commission on Slavery and the University, excerpts from Nelson and Harold’s Charlottesville 2017, and excerpts from Nelson and McInnis’s Educated in Tyranny). Next, we will look at how writers speak back to silences and suppressed narratives (texts:  Colson Whitehead’s Underground Railroad, Petrosino’s White Blood, and Sharpe’s In the Wake). Throughout the course, we’ll look at current conversations about racial justice at UVA and beyond as well as community responses compiled by the Institute for Engagement and Negotiation[1] (IEN) in designing and executing the Memorial to Enslaved Laborers[2]. In the final month of the course, we will design and complete projects that speak back to these issues of race at UVA and/or further the goals and aspirations the IEN identified in crafting the memorial: 

  • Prominent and highly visible 

  • Powerful and Educational Experience 

  • Emotional Experience through Representation 

  • List known names of Enslaved 

  • Forge Connection with Community 

  • Ongoing Memorialization Process 

  • Distributed or Multiple Linked Locations Express the Dualities of Enslavement  

  • Incorporate the Sounds and Songs of Enslavement  

  • Show Pain of Bondage and Hope for the Future[3] 


[1] https://www.arch.virginia.edu/ien/about-ien 

[2] https://www.arch.virginia.edu/ien/projects-services/memorial-to-enslaved-laborers 

[3] Dukes, Frank. “IEN Public Service: Equitable Collaboration.” Presentation at Public Service Week. University of Virginia, Charlottesville, 17. Mar 21. Address. 

005 - Vegan Writing

TR 02:00PM-03:15PM Bryan 310
Lindgren Johnson

What does it mean to write vegan? “Plant-based” cookbooks and PETA pamphlets might come to mind. But what happens when we approach veganism not just in terms of diet or even the essential work of animal liberation but as a deeper and wider foundation for thinking in ethical relation to all species, including our own, and the broader environment? What is the writing that organically emerges out of this foundation? 

This class will explore what becomes possible to think and write when we assume a foundation of vegan nonviolence. This shared commitment will allow us to see violence that we have been taught does not really count as violence, and we’ll ask why and how the larger culture continues to discipline all of us to think, write, and act in ways that destroy others’ relations, cultures, and lives, dulling our intellectual and ethical capacities and impoverishing our own lives in the process. The other and exciting side of the coin, then, is how vegan nonviolence opens us up to worlds and lives that otherwise could not be apprehended, and we will explore how vegan writing animates rather than destroys lives, even as it does not presume to know those lives fully. Many of our readings, which will include a range of material (children’s literature, scientific articles on animal cognition, philosophy, critical race theory, agroecology, film theory, literary criticism, and more), will attend not only to vegan thinking and writing but to the experience of living vegan, which can be isolating, and the class will be a space of support for those who experience such isolation. We will conclude the semester with independent projects that will give you room to go your own direction but that will also receive the benefit of class feedback in a workshop environment.  

We will not be approaching veganism, then, as a solution simply to be applied to inherently violent systems (the “Go Vegan!” mantra) but as an ethical and intellectual foundation that yields revolutionary thinking and writing regarding, among other things, other-than-human autonomy and sovereignty, gender and racial equality, environmental health, equitable land access, and prison abolition. Rather than narratives and systems of lack, punishment, and violence, how can we create narratives—and out of these narratives, systems—of plenitude, support, and love?

The class is open to all who are interested in doing the kind of work described above—no previous experience with vegan thinking required! Instructor permission (one paragraph describing why you want to take the course) is required for enrollment but is simply aimed at ensuring that everyone understands the nature of the course and will allow us to check in with one another before the semester begins.

006 - Rewriting Yourself: Literacy & the Brain

MWF 11:00AM-11:50AM Bryan 330
Heidi Nobles

What do we know and what are we still learning about writing and the human brain? Literacy has dramatically reshaped the human brain over millennia. Yet as literacy itself evolves, we still lack satisfactory data on how writing (and its counterpart, reading) affects our neurology and cognition--and therefore, how literacy affects who we are as humans. In this reading- and writing-intensive course, we will read a range of work on literacy and cognition, including technical and popular treatments of issues such as reading and neural development, brain function during writing tasks, brain activity connected to other creative tasks, and more. We’ll read work from creativity experts, neurologists and cognitive scientists, psychologists, mental health practitioners, computer scientists, and professional writers and editors, all in trying to understand the relationship between literacy and our minds. Reading assignments will include 1-4 extended “read-in” activities; writing assignments will include a combination of creative, reflective, and research-based projects. By the term’s end, you should have an enriched sense of yourself as a reader and writer, and how your literacy practices play into your larger identity.

Note: This class welcomes students with multiple interests and backgrounds for interdisciplinary discussions about how reading and writing affect us all. Students with prior experience in or specialized interest in the brain will be able to dive deeper; students who are more inclined toward the arts and humanities can also expect engaging readings and lively writing assignments.

ENWR 2610-001 - Writing with Style

TR 02:00PM-03:15PM New Cabell 036
Keith Driver

ENWR 2700 - News Writing (2 sections)

No fake news here, but rather progressive exercises in developing the news-writing style of writing from straight hard news to "soft" features. Satisfies Second Writing Requirement.

001
TR 08:00AM-09:15AM Bryan 203
Brian Kelly

002
TR 09:30AM-10:45AM Bryan 203
Brian Kelly

ENWR 2800 - Public Speaking (3 sections)

001
MWF 09:00AM-09:50AM Bryan 312
Kiera Allison

002
MWF 10:00AM-10:50AM Bryan 312
Kiera Allison

009
MW 02:00PM-03:15PM Bryan 310
devin donovan

ENWR 3500-002 - Environmental Justice Writing

TR 02:00PM-03:15PM Bryan 312
Cory Shaman

ENWR 3550-001 - Advanced Digital Writing & Rhetoric

Mapping

TR 12:30PM-01:45PM Bryan 330
Kevin Smith

ENWR 3660-001 - Travel Writing

TR 09:30AM-10:45AM Bryan 312
Kate Stephenson

Why is everyone suddenly going to Iceland? Why do we travel? What is the difference between a traveler and a tourist?  Using different types of writing, including journal entries, forum posts, peer reviews, and formal papers, we will explore the world of travel writing.  Since we all write best about subjects and ideas we are passionate about, we will work together to generate interesting questions about the role of travel in our culture, as well as about specific books and essays. We will also investigate the world of tourism and consider the many ethical issues that arise in the exploration of our modern world. Throughout the course, we will ponder questions like:

  • What is the relationship between travel writer, reader, and inhabitant? How can we use writing to navigate the relationship between writer, reader, inhabitant, and place?
  • What is the role of “outsider” in travel writing?
  • How does travel writing encourage us to see ourselves differently?
  • How can we use the very best of travel writing—the sense of discovery, voice, narrative suspense—in other forms of writing, including academic essays?
  • Can travel writing evoke political and social change?

As the semester unfolds, I hope we will revise and refine our views, paying close attention to how we put words together to write powerfully and engagingly about travel.

ENWR 3900-001 - Career-Based Writing/Rhetoric

MWF 01:00PM-01:50PM Bryan 330
Jon D'Errico

Develops proficiency in a range of stylistic and persuasive effects. The course is designed for students who want to hone their writing skills, as well as for students preparing for careers in which they will write documents for public circulation. Students explore recent research in writing studies. In the workshop-based studio sessions, students propose, write, and edit projects of their own design.