Fall 2024 Course Descriptions

Two-Semester First-Year Writing Courses

ENWR 1505 - Writing and Critical Inquiry: The Stretch Sequence (8 sections)

Offers a two-semester approach to the First Writing Requirement. This sequence allows students to take more time, in smaller sections and with support from the Writing Center, practicing and reinforcing the activities that are central to the first-year writing course. Like ENWR 1510, ENWR 1505-06 approaches writing as a way of generating, representing, and reflecting on critical inquiry. Students contribute to an academic conversation about a specific subject of inquiry and learn to position their ideas and research in relation to the ideas and research of others.  Instructors place student writing at the center of course, encourage students to think on the page, and prepare them to reflect on contemporary forms of expression.  Students read and respond to each other’s writing in class regularly, and they engage in thoughtful reflection on their own rhetorical choices as well as those of peers and published writers.  Additionally, the course requires students to give an oral presentation on their research and to assemble a digital portfolio of their writing.

001 -- Writing about Culture/Society
MW 01:00PM-01:50PM (CAB 042)
Claire A Chantell
 
002 -- Writing about Culture/Society
MW 02:00PM-03:15PM (CAB 042)
Claire Chantell
 
003 -- Writing about Culture/Society
TR 02:00PM-03:15PM (BRN 203)
Patricia Sullivan
 
004 -- Writing about Culture/Society
TR 03:30PM-04:45PM (BRN 203)
Patricia Sullivan
 
005 -- Writing about Culture/Society - Literacy Narratives
TR 11:00AM-12:15PM (CAB 042)
Kate Kostelnik
 
006 -- Writing about Culture/Society
TR 11:00AM-12:15PM (CAB 066)
Kate Natishan
 
007 -- Writing about Culture/Society - Literacy Narratives
TR 12:30PM-01:45PM (CAB 042)
Kate Kostelnik
 
008 -- Writing about Culture/Society
TR 09:30AM-10:45AM (CAB 066)
Kate Natishan

Single-Semester First-Year Writing Courses

ENWR 1510 - Writing and Critical Inquiry (70+ sections)

Approaches writing as a way of generating, representing, and reflecting on critical inquiry. Students contribute to an academic conversation about a specific subject of inquiry and learn to position their ideas and research in relation to the ideas and research of others.  Instructors place student writing at the center of course, encourage students to think on the page, and prepare them to reflect on contemporary forms of expression.  Students read and respond to each other’s writing in class regularly, and they engage in thoughtful reflection on their own rhetorical choices as well as those of peers and published writers.  Additionally, the course requires students to give an oral presentation on their research and to assemble a digital portfolio of their writing.

001 -- TBA
MWF 09:00AM-09:50AM (CAB 064)
TBA

002 -- Writing about Culture/Society - Writing about Misinformation
TR 08:00AM-09:15AM (CAB 056)
Jack Crouse
 
003 – Writing & Community Engagement - Walking Charlottesville
TR 02:00PM-03:15PM (BRN 312)
Kate Stephenson

This seminar will explore the connections between walking, writing, social justice, and activism. There is a long history of walking as a means of igniting thought, creativity, and dialogue that dates back to the meanderings of Socrates and Aristotle and continues through the strolls of the Romantic poets, the city wanderings of the fictional J. Alfred Prufrock and Clarissa Dalloway, and the outdoor hikes of Wendell Berry. But walking isn’t just linked to creativity and conversation; it’s also clearly connected to social justice. Walking to freedom, as depicted in myriad slave narratives and immigration stories, as well as walking for freedom in the form of protest marches, both past and present, are important reminders that our footsteps matter.   In this class, we will consider how walking can be both a solo activity and a means of creating community. By walking together, we will learn about the places and histories around us.  The course will be structured around biweekly walks themed around social justice. All walks and place-based visits will include time for reflective writing.

004 – Writing about Culture/Society - Magical Realism
TR 05:00PM-06:15PM (CAB 211)
Jess Gomez
 
005 -- Writing about Science & Tech - Writing with AI
TR 05:00PM-06:15PM (BRN 330)
Katherine Churchill
 
006 -- Writing about Culture/Society - Writing about Landscape
MWF 10:00AM-10:50AM (SHN 111)
Barman, Shalmi
 
007 -- Writing about the Arts - The Art of Communication
MWF 09:00AM-09:50AM (BRN 310)
Jeddie Sophronius
 
008 -- Writing about Society - Narrative and Reality
MWF 09:00AM-09:50AM (CAB 044)
Garrett Kim
 
009 -- Writing about Identities
MWF 10:00AM-10:50AM (BRN 312)
Devin Donovan
(Transfer Students ONLY)
 
010 -- Writing about Science & Tech - Citizen Science
TR 09:30AM-10:45AM (BRN 330)
Cory Shaman
 
011 -- Writing about the Arts - Rhetorics of Animation 
MWF 11:00AM-11:50AM (BRN 310)
M Stiffler 
 
012 -- Writing about Culture/Society
MWF 10:00AM-10:50AM (BRN 334)
Jon D'Errico
 
014 -- Writing about Culture/Society - Writing About Sports
MW 03:30PM-04:45PM (CAB 064)
Rhiannon Goad
 
015 -- Writing about the Arts - Nature Writing and the Environment
MW 03:30PM-04:45PM (BRN 332)
Mason Robertson
 
016 -- Writing about Identities - Aliens and Identities
TR 09:30AM-10:45AM (CAB 594)
Charity Fowler
 
017 -- Writing about Identities
MWF 11:00AM-11:50AM (BRN 312)
Devin Donovan
(Transfer Students ONLY)
 
018 -- Writing about Identity - Gender in Speculative Fiction 
MWF 09:00AM-09:50AM (BRN 334)
Spencer Grayson

What does it mean to inhabit a gendered body and experience? How are gendered bodies read by others, and how can we use language to articulate our lived experiences of gender? This course will explore how speculative fiction writers imagine diverse genders, embodiments, and expressions. We’ll read a range of short stories, graphic novels, and digital media, and watch segments from TV episodes and music videos. Through these works, we’ll think about gender and writing as both objects—things that are created—and processes—the act of creation. In examining how these works use speculative fiction to construct and reimagine gender, you’ll consider how your own writing, from close readings to argumentative essays, can be transformed through rhetorical technique, organizational strategies, and peer revision.
 
019 -- TBA
TR 05:00PM-06:15PM (BRN 312)
TBA
 
020 -- Writing about Science & Tech 
MWF 09:00AM-09:50AM (BRN 330)
Eric Rawson
 
022 -- Multilingual Writers
MWF 12:00PM-12:50PM (BRN 332)
Davy Tran
(Multilingual/international students ONLY)
 
024 -- Writing about Culture/Society - Writing about Landscape
MWF 12:00PM-12:50PM (SHN 111)
Shalmi Barman
 
026 -- TBA
MW 02:00PM-03:15PM (BRN 332)
TBA

027 -- TBA
MW 05:00PM-06:15PM (CAB 044)
TBA
 
028 -- Writing about Identities - Writing about Emotions 
TR 05:00PM-6:15PM (BRN 332)
Zana Christjohn

In this course, we will explore how we convey, experience, and understand emotions through writing. What role do emotions play in communication and the writing experience? What difficulties arise when trying to communicate specific emotions? Are there any emotions that cannot be understood through writing, and, if so, how do we try to communicate them? We will work together to develop our writing skills through this investigation in a collaborative course setting.

Throughout the semester, you will expand your rhetorical agility through several writing projects to answer these and other questions, which you will then workshop with each other and revise. You will be asked to reflect on your personal experiences of/with emotion and discuss reactions to the pieces we read together in class. Working together as a community of writers, you will have ample opportunities to strengthen your voice through group discussion, class sharing, and extended engagement with the same pieces of writing. Through this line of inquiry, you will gain better insight into the ongoing process of writing at the college level and be able to apply these communicative skills to your future classes.

029 -- Writing about the Arts - Writing about Film
MW 03:30PM-04:45PM (AST 265)
Annyston Pennington
 
031 -- TBA
MWF 09:00AM-09:50AM (BRN 332)
TBA
 
032 -- Writing & Community Engagement - You and AI
TR 09:30AM-10:45AM (BRN 332)
Piers Gelly
 
033 -- TBA
TR 08:00AM-09:15AM (BRN 310)
TBA
 
034 -- Multilingual Writers
MWF 01:00PM-01:50PM (BRN 310)
Davy Tran
(Multilingual/international students ONLY)
 
035 -- Writing about Culture/Society
MWF 11:00AM-11:50AM (BRN 334)
Jon D'Errico
 
036 -- Writing about Digital Media - The Art of the Post: Performance in Public Places
TR 11:00AM-12:15PM (BRN 332)
Dana Little
 
037 -- Writing about the Arts - The Art of Communication
MWF 10:00AM-10:50AM (BRN 310)
Jeddie Sophronius
 
040 -- Writing about Digital Media
TR 11:00AM-12:15PM (BRN 334)
Kevin Smith
 
042 -- Writing about the Arts - Science Fiction, Fantasy, and the Self
MWF 01:00PM-01:50PM (BRN 312)
Caroline Erickson
 
043 -- Writing about Culture/Society - Storytelling Across Media & Cultures
TR 11:00AM-12:15PM (CAB 187)
Sethunya Mokoko
 
044 -- TBA
MWF 10:00AM-10:50AM (BRN 332)
TBA
 
045 -- Writing about Science & Tech 
MWF 10:00AM-10:50AM (BRN 330)
Eric Rawson
 
046 -- Writing about Digital Media - The Art of the Post: Performance in Public Places
TR 12:30PM-01:45PM (BRN 332)
Dana Little
 
047 -- Writing about Culture/Society - Writing About Sports
MW 02:00PM-03:15PM (BRN 330)
Rhiannon Goad 

050 -- Writing about Culture/Society - Storytelling Across Media & Cultures
TR 12:30PM-01:45PM (CAB 056)
Sethunya Mokoko
 
051 -- Writing about Culture/Society
TR 05:00PM-06:15PM (CAB 411)
Keith Driver
(Transfer Students ONLY)
 
052 -- TBA 
TR 08:00AM-09:15AM (CAB 044)
Mack Gregg
 
053 -- Writing about Culture/Society - The Good Life
MWF 09:00AM-09:50AM (CAB 056)
Jasmine Piescik

What does it mean to live “the good life”? Is there such a thing as the good life, is it different than a good life, and how do you go about finding it? How do you know when you have it? In this course, we’ll unpack accounts of the good life both old and new, from formal treatises to popular cultural contexts like shows, short stories, and social media. In doing so, we will seek to understand the explicit and implicit arguments we often encounter about what living well looks like. 
 
054 -- Writing about Identities - Words and the World
TR 11:00AM-12:15PM (AST 265)
Aryeh Lieber
 
056 -- Writing & Community Engagement - You and AI
TR 08:00AM-09:15AM (BRN 332)
Piers Gelly
 
057 -- Writing about Identities - Words and the World
TR 09:30AM-10:45AM (AST 265)
Aryeh Lieber
 
058 -- TBA
TR 09:30AM-10:45AM (BRN 310)
TBA
 
060 -- Writing about the Arts - Poetic Prose
MW 03:30PM-04:45PM (CAB 056)
Wheeler Light
 
061 -- Writing about Science & Tech
TR 11:00AM-12:15PM (BRN 330)
Cory Shaman
 
062 -- Writing about the Arts
TR 02:00PM-03:15PM (BRN 332)
Hodges Adams
 
063 -- Writing about the Arts - On Style
TR 08:00AM-09:15AM (BRN 334)
Henrietta Hadley
 
064 -- Writing about the Arts - The Fool
MW 05:00PM-06:15PM (CAB 036)
Bella Lewis
 
066 -- Writing about Culture/Society - Writing into Wonder
TR 03:30PM-04:45PM (BRN 334)
Cy March
 
067 -- Writing about Culture/Society - Writing into Wonder
TR 05:00PM-06:15PM (BRN 334)
Cy March
 
068 -- Writing about Identities - Aliens and Identities
TR 11:00AM-12:15PM (CAB 183)
Charity Fowler
 
071 -- Writing about the Arts - The Fool
MW 06:30PM-07:45PM (BRN 310)
Bella Lewis
 
072 -- Writing about Digital Media 
TR 12:30PM-01:45PM (BRN 334)
Kevin Smith
 
073 -- Writing about the Arts - Writing about Others and Ourselves
TR 08:00AM-09:15AM (BRN 330)
Tom Williams

Let’s face it, other people are fascinating, and we spend a great deal of time looking at and thinking about what it is they have to say, whether we follow their posts on our phones or read about them in books. But why do we bother? Why are we interested in their views? And what relation do their views have with our own? These are some of the questions that we’ll consider as we examine a variety of personal essays in different genres and different media. As we read, look, and listen to others we’ll think about the role that writing plays in the formation of ideas and we’ll examine ways to develop our own in ways that help other people understand what it is we have to say.

 
074 -- Writing about the Arts - What is There not There?: On Telling & Making Without
MW 03:30PM-04:45PM (BRN 334)
Alexa Luborsky
 
075 -- Writing about Culture/Society - Writing, Place, & Ethics
TR 12:30PM-01:45PM (SHN 111)
Ethan Evans
 
076 -- Writing about Culture/Society - At the Margins of Queer and Trans
TR 08:00AM-09:15AM (BRN 312)
Karthik Shankar
 
077 -- TBA
TR 03:30PM-04:45PM (BRN 310)
TBA
 
078 -- Writing about the Arts - (Re)Buildings
TR 06:30PM-07:45PM (BRN 312)
Gabby Kiser

In this ENWR 1510 section, we will focus on representations of different types of buildings and unpack how people operate in and outside of those spaces. Consider houses, malls, and diners, for example; how do each of these settings affect our expectations of creative works that take place in them? Though we may already feel familiar with these places, we will reexamine them through new eyes and welcome myriad interpretations and connotations. While this is a writing course, literature, academic essays, television, video games, and podcasts will be valuable to our conversations. Through this range of mediums, we will navigate and practice writing about the varying affordances and limitations of different mediums and genres.
 
080 -- Writing about the Arts - Writing about Disney
MW 05:00PM-06:15PM (BRN 334)
Jared Wilden
 
081 -- Writing about Culture/Society - Writing about Sports
MWF 11:00AM-11:50AM (BRN 332)
Tanner Hansen
 
082 -- Writing about Culture/Society - Indigenous Rhetorics
TR 09:30AM-10:45AM (BRN 312)
Sarah Richardson
 
083 -- Writing about Culture/Society - Writing about Joy
MWF 01:00PM-01:50PM (BRN 330)
River Robins
 
085 -- Writing about the Arts - On Style
TR 09:30AM-10:45AM (BRN 334)
Henrietta Hadley
 
086 -- Writing about Culture/Society - Storytelling Across Mediums
TR 11:00AM-12:15PM (CAB 115)
Paola Mendez-Garcia
 
087 -- Writing about Culture/Society - Critical Observation: Writing as an Exploratory Act
MWF 09:00AM-09:50AM (BRN 312)
Adnan Zarif
 
088 -- Writing about Culture/Society - Indigenous Rhetorics
TR 11:00AM-12:15PM (BRN 312)
Sarah Richardson
 
089 -- Writing about Culture/Society - Writing About Monsters
MW 03:30PM-04:45PM (SHN 111)
Cameron Berry
 
090 -- Writing about the Arts - Poetic Prose
MW 05:00PM-06:15PM (BRN 332)
Wheeler Light

091 -- TBA
TR 02:00PM-03:15PM (BRK 103)
Courtney Watts

092 -- Writing about Culture/Society - Writing, Place, & Ethics
TR 05:00PM-06:15AM (KER 317)
Ethan Evans

093 -- Writing about Culture/Society - Archives of Experiences
TR (05:00PM-06:15PM) (RICE 011)
Hyeona Park

ENWR 1520 - Writing and Community Engagement (1 section)

001 -- TR 12:30PM-01:45PM (BRN 312) - Writing about Food Justice
Kate Stephenson

Why do we eat what we eat? Do poor people eat more fast food than wealthy people? Why are Cheetos cheaper than cherries? Do you have to be skinny to be hungry? By volunteering at the UVA Student Garden, Morven Kitchen Garden, UVA Community Food Pantry, Loaves and Fishes, or the PVCC Community Garden and using different types of writing, including journal entries, forum posts, peer reviews, and formal papers, we will explore topics like food insecurity, food production, hunger stereotypes, privilege, urban gardening, and community engagement.  

Community engagement courses depend on creating pathways between different kinds of knowledge that enable us to learn with our minds, hearts, and bodies. The classroom is not a place where we find the answer; instead, it is a space for inquiry where process rather than product prevails. We will explore first-hand the ways in which academic conversations—and civic conversations—emphasize questions rather than answers. We will redefine knowledge—where it originates, who creates it, and how it circulates—by seeing the community outside the classroom as a site of knowledge production. 

ENWR 1530 - Writing About the Imagination

MW 01:00PM-01:50PM (MON 130)
Kenny Fountain

Discussion Sections: F 9:00AM, 10:00AM, 11:00AM, and 12:00PM.

Imagining and visualizing are key components of perceiving the world, remembering the part, and envisioning new futures. And words play an important role in how we imagine. That is, words make absence things present, bring to mind people, objects, and events remote in time or space, and allow us to conceive of possibilities that do not yet exist.
In this First Writing Requirement (FWR) course, we will explore how writers and researchers have investigated the imagination. To do this, we will read work from across several disciplines, from rhetoric and philosophy to cognitive science, history, and literature. As we do this, we will examine how these writers use verbal description, visual imagery, lively storytelling, compelling evidence, and persuasive argument. 

ENWR 2510 - Advanced Writing Seminar (4 sections)

001 -- Writing about Identities - Writing Regret and Repair
MW 03:30PM-04:45PM (BRN 330)
Tamika Carey
  
003 -- Writing about Identities
MWF 01:00PM-01:50PM (BRN 332)
Devin Donovan
 
004 -- TBA
TR 11:00AM-12:15PM (CAB 594)
TBA
 
006 -- Writing about Science & Technology
MWF 12:00PM-12:50PM (BRN 310)
Eric Rawson

007 -- TBA
MWF 12:00PM-12:50PM (BRN 312)
TBA

Beyond First-Year Writing Courses

ENWR 2520 - Special Topics in Writing (4 sections)

003 -- Writing Democratic Rights
T 06:00PM-08:30PM (BRN 310)
Stephen Parks

Students will study theories of democracy and work with global democratic advocates, as well as students located in internatioanal contexts.

008 -- Writing about Medicine
MW 05:00PM-06:15PM (BRN 310)
Rhiannon Goad

009 -- Community Engagement  
TR 02:00PM-03:15PM (BRN 310)
Sarah Richardson

010 -- Writing and Games
TR 02:00PM-03:15PM (BRN 330)
Kate Natishan

011 -- Writing as Science, Art, and Critical Inquiry
MWF 12:00PM-12:50PM (BRN 334)
Heidi Nobles

012 -- Writing as Science, Art, and Critical Inquiry
MWF 11:00AM-11:50AM (BRN 330)
Heidi Nobles

013 -- TBA
TR 04:00PM-05:15PM (CAB 132)
TBA

ENWR 2640 - Writing as Technology

TR 11:00AM-12:15PM (BRN 203)
Patricia Sullivan

This course explores historical, theoretical, and practical conceptions of writing as technology. We will study various writing systems, the relation of writing to speaking and visual media, and the development of writing technologies (manuscript, printing presses, typewriters, hypertext, text messaging, and artificial intelligence). Students will produce written academic and personal essays, but will also experiment with multimedia electronic texts, such as web sites, digital essays/stories, and AI generated texts

ENWR 2700 - News Writing

TR 09:30AM-10:45AM (BRN 203)
Kate Sweeney

ENWR 2800 - Public Speaking

001 - The Power of Performance: From TED Talks to TikTok
TR 03:30PM-04:45PM (BRN 330)
Dana Little

ENWR 3500 - Topics in Advanced Writing & Rhetoric

003 - Race, Rhetoric, and Social Justice
TR 03:30PM-04:45PM (CAB 036)
Sethunya Mokoko

ENWR 3620 - Writing and Tutoring Across Cultures

TR 03:30PM-04:45PM (BRN 332)
Kate Kostelnik

In this course, we'll look at a variety of texts from academic arguments, narratives, and pedagogies, to consider what it means to write, communicate, and learn across cultures. Topics will include contrastive rhetorics, world Englishes, rhetorical listening, and tutoring multilingual writers. A service learning component will require students to volunteer weekly in the community.

ENWR 3640 - Writing with Sound

TR 11:00AM-12:15PM (RTN 152)
Steph Ceraso

In this collaborative, project-based course, students will learn to script, design, edit, and produce an original podcast series. In addition to reading about and practicing professional audio storytelling techniques (e.g. interviewing, writing for the ear, sound design), each student will get to work with a team to produce an episode for the podcast series. No experience with digital audio editing is necessary. Beginners welcome!

ENWR 3665 - Writing about the Environment

TR 02:00PM-03:15PM (BRN 334)
Cory Shaman

ENWR 3760 - Studies in Cultural Rhetoric

M 06:00PM-08:30PM (BRN 312)
Tamika Carey

ENWR 3900 - Career Based Writing and Rhetoric

MW 03:30PM-04:45PM (CAB 068)
John T. Casteen IV