Spring 2023 Course Descriptions

Two-Semester First-Year Writing Courses

ENWR 1506 - Writing and Critical Inquiry: The Stretch Sequence

Offers a two-semester approach to the First Writing Requirement. This sequence allows students to take more time, in smaller sections and with support from the Writing Center, practicing and reinforcing the activities that are central to the first-year writing course. Like ENWR 1510, ENWR 1505-06 approaches writing as a way of generating, representing, and reflecting on critical inquiry. Students contribute to an academic conversation about a specific subject of inquiry and learn to position their ideas and research in relation to the ideas and research of others.  Instructors place student writing at the center of course, encourage students to think on the page, and prepare them to reflect on contemporary forms of expression.  Students read and respond to each other’s writing in class regularly, and they engage in thoughtful reflection on their own rhetorical choices as well as those of peers and published writers.  Additionally, the course requires students to give an oral presentation on their research and to assemble a digital portfolio of their writing.

001 - Writing about Identities  - Collaborative Inquiry Into Race & Identity
TR 12:30PM-01:45PM (New Cabell 042)
Kate Kostelnik

002 - Writing about Culture/Society - Writing About Food
MW 02:00PM-03:15PM (Moroe 114)
Claire Chantell

003 - Writing about Culture/Society - Writing About Food
MW 03:30PM-04:45PM (New Cabell 111)
Claire Chantell

004 - Writing about Culture/Society - Writing About Place: Identity, and Community​
TR 02:00PM-03:15PM (Bryan 203)
Patricia Sullivan

005 - Writing about Culture/Society - Writing About Place: Identity, and Community​
TR 03:30PM-04:45PM (Bryan 203)
Patricia Sullivan 

006 - Writing about Culture/Society - Contemporary Pop Culture
TR 11:00AM-12:15PM (New Cabell 038)
David Coyoca

007 - Writing about Identities - Collaborative Inquiry Into Race & Identity
TR 11:00AM-12:15PM (New Cabell 066)
Kate Kostelnik

008 - Writing about Culture/Society - The Art of Protest; how protest music, film and literature influence society
TR 02:00PM-03:15PM (New Cabell 036)
Amber McBride

009 - Writing about Culture/Society - The Art of Protest; how protest music, film and literature influence society
TR 03:30PM-04:45PM (New Cabell 183)
Amber McBride

010 - Writing about Identities
MWF 10:00AM-10:50AM (New Cabell 066)
Rebecca Thomas

012 - Writing & Community Engagement - Language, Policy, and Politics
TR 11:00AM-12:15PM (Bryan 203)
Kate Natishan

Rhetoric - how words are chosen and used - can impact everything from how we understand problems and create policies to how we engage in politics and create identity. It's never "just words." This class will explore how language use by public figures and citizens impacts how policies are adapted and written, and how the political arena is changed by the use of language. We will consider the broad-reaching impact of words on our fellow citizens. 

013 - Writing & Community Engagement - Language, Policy, and Politics
TR 12:30PM-01:45PM (Bryan 233)
Kate Natishan

Rhetoric - how words are chosen and used - can impact everything from how we understand problems and create policies to how we engage in politics and create identity. It's never "just words." This class will explore how language use by public figures and citizens impacts how policies are created and written as well as how the political arena is changed by the use of language. We will consider the broad-reaching impact of words on our fellow citizens.

Single-Semester First-Year Writing Courses

ENWR 1510 - Writing and Critical Inquiry (70+ sections)

Approaches writing as a way of generating, representing, and reflecting on critical inquiry. Students contribute to an academic conversation about a specific subject of inquiry and learn to position their ideas and research in relation to the ideas and research of others.  Instructors place student writing at the center of course, encourage students to think on the page, and prepare them to reflect on contemporary forms of expression.  Students read and respond to each other’s writing in class regularly, and they engage in thoughtful reflection on their own rhetorical choices as well as those of peers and published writers.  Additionally, the course requires students to give an oral presentation on their research and to assemble a digital portfolio of their writing.

 

001 - Writing about Digital Media - Our Lives Online
TR 12:30PM-01:45PM (New Cabell 068)
Kevin Smith

From targeted ads to TikTok influencers, from BeReal to the Metaverse, much of our lived experience is shaped and informed by digital technologies and much of our writing and communication circulates online. This section of 1510 will examine our relationships to the technologies we use and how those relationships intersect with our reading and writing practices. How have the materials, practices, and conceptions of reading and writing shifted in the past ten years? What about the past twenty years? The past fifty?

002 - Writing about Culture/Society - Writing our Destinies: Man, Myth, and Magic
TR 08:00AM-09:15AM (Bryan 330)
Caroline Greenblatt
 
003 - Writing & Community Engagement
TR 03:30PM-04:45PM (Bryan 334)
Hajjar Baban

004 - Writing about the Arts
MWF 12:00PM-12:50PM (New Cabell 044)
Hodges Adams

What does good writing actually look like? How is it made? This class focuses on the process of writing and revising. Students will consider a variety of mediums, from novels to poetry to essays to visual art, in an attempt to understand both how art is made and how it can teach them about their own capabilities and possibilities as writers. Student papers will be peer reviewed and revised multiple times during class. There will also be class trips to the Special Collections Library, the Memorial to the Enslaved Laborers and the Rotunda, Clemons Library, and the Fralin Museum of Art. 
 
005 - Writing about the Arts
TR 09:30AM-10:45AM (New Cabell 064)
Charity Fowler
 
006 - Writing about the Arts - Black Arts Matter
TR 05:00PM-06:15PM (Nau 242)
Arselyne Chery
 
007 - Writing about Science & Tech
MWF 09:00AM-09:50AM (Bryan 310)
Eric Rawson
 
008 - Writing about Culture/Society
MWF 10:00AM-10:50AM (Brooks 103)
Derek Cavens
 
009 - Writing about Identities
MWF 12:00PM-12:50PM (New Cabell 407)
Henrietta Hadley
 
010 - Writing about Culture/Society
TR 12:30PM-01:45PM (Bryan 312)
Keith Driver
 
012 - Writing about Culture/Society
TR 12:30PM-01:45PM (Nau 142)
John T. Casteen IV
 
013 - Multilingual Writers
MWF 12:00PM-12:50PM (Bryan 310)
Matthias Maunsell
 
014 - Writing about Culture/Society
MWF 01:00PM-01:50PM (Shannon 111)
Derek Cavens
 
015 - Writing about the Arts
MWF 09:00AM-09:50AM (New Cabell 594)
Jana Horn
 
016 - Writing about Culture/Society
MWF 10:00AM-10:50AM (Bryan 312)
Jon D'Errico
 
017 - Writing & Community Engagement
MW 05:00PM-06:15PM (New Cabell 056)
Piers Gelly
 
018 - Writing & Community Engagement
MW 03:30PM-04:45PM (Bryan 334)
Piers Gelly
 
019 - Writing about Science & Tech
MWF 10:00AM-10:50AM (New Cabell 032)
Eric Rawson
 
020 - Writing & Community Engagement
TR 05:00PM-06:15PM (Bryan 310)
Amanda Boivin
 
021 - Writing about Culture/Society
MW 05:00PM-06:15PM (Bryan 312)
Rianna Turner
 
022 - Writing about Identities
MWF 10:00AM-10:50AM (Bryan 330)
devin donovan
 
023 - Writing about the Arts
MW 02:00PM-03:15PM (New Cabell 183)
Rachel Kravetz
 
024 - Writing & Community Engagement
MWF 09:00AM-09:50AM (Bryan 332)
Instructor TBD
 
025 - Writing about the Arts
TR 12:30PM-01:45PM (Gibson 241)
Casey Ireland
 
026 - Writing & Community Engagement - Writing about Place
MW 08:00AM-09:15AM (Bryan 235)
Nana Boateng
 
027 - Writing about the Arts
TR 09:30AM-10:45AM (Bryan 310)
Gahl Pratt Pardes
 
028 - Writing about the Arts
MW 05:00PM-06:15PM (New Cabell 027)
Rachel Kravetz
 
029 - Writing about Culture/Society - Tabletop Games as Culture
MW 05:00PM-06:15PM (Bryan 310)
Chandler Jennings
 
030 - Writing about the Arts
MWF 11:00AM-11:50AM (New Cabell 287)
Hodges Adams

What does good writing actually look like? How is it made? This class focuses on the process of writing and revising. Students will consider a variety of mediums, from novels to poetry to essays to visual art, in an attempt to understand both how art is made and how it can teach them about their own capabilities and possibilities as writers. Student papers will be peer reviewed and revised multiple times during class. There will also be class trips to the Special Collections Library, the Memorial to the Enslaved Laborers and the Rotunda, Clemons Library, and the Fralin Museum of Art. 

031 - Writing about Culture/Society
MWF 11:00AM-11:50AM (Bryan 312)
Jon D'Errico
 
032 - Writing about the Arts
MW 03:30PM-04:45PM (Bryan 310)
Rachel Kravetz
 
033 - Writing about Science & Tech
TR 11:00AM-12:15PM (Bryan 330)
Cory Shaman
 
034 - Writing about the Arts - Are Oldies Still Goodies? Writing about Music and Movies
TR 08:00AM-09:15AM (Bryan 235)
Samuel Jacob
 
035 - Writing about Culture/Society
MWF 11:00AM-11:50AM (Brooks 103)
Derek Cavens
 
036 - Writing about Digital Media
TR 03:30PM-04:45PM (New Cabell 207)
Valerie Voight
 
037 - Writing about Science & Tech
TR 09:30AM-10:45AM (Rotunda 152)
Cory Shaman
 
038 - Writing about Culture/Society
MWF 12:00PM-12:50PM (Bryan 330)
Instructor TBD
 
039 - Writing about Culture/Society - Writing about Time
TR 05:00PM-06:15PM (Bryan 330)
Laura McGehee
 
040 - Writing & Community Engagement
TR 05:00PM-06:15PM (Bryan 332)
Hajjar Baban
 
041 - Writing about Culture/Society
TR 08:00AM-09:15AM (Bryan 334)
Kathryn Webb-Destefano
 
042 - Writing about Culture/Society - Writing about Time
TR 03:30PM-04:45PM (Bryan 330)
Laura McGehee
 
043 - Writing about Culture/Society - This is the Future
TR 08:00AM-09:15AM (Bryan 312)
Rebecca Barry
 
044 - Multilingual Writers
MWF 11:00AM-11:50AM (New Cabell 291)
Matthias Maunsell
 
045 - Writing about Culture/Society
MW 02:00PM-03:15PM (New Cabell 191)
Steph Ceraso
 
046 - Writing about Culture/Society
MW 08:00AM-09:15AM (Bryan 203)
Kathryn Bennington
 
047 - Writing & Community Engagement
MWF 11:00AM-11:50AM (Bryan 334)
Instructor TBD
 
048 - Writing about the Arts
TR 02:00PM-03:15PM (Bryan 310)
Valerie Voight
 
049 - Writing about Digital Media - Videogames (and what we think about them)
MW 03:30PM-04:45PM (Bryan 312)
Alexander Slansky
 
050 - Writing about Culture/Society
TR 08:00AM-09:15AM (Bryan 332)
Instructor TBD
 
051 - Writing about Culture/Society - The Pursuit of Happiness
TR 05:00PM-06:15PM (Bryan 203)
Rachel Beth Haines
 
052 - Writing about the Arts
TR 09:30AM-10:45AM (New Cabell 036)
Cristina Griffin
 
053 - Writing about Identities
TR 08:00AM-09:15AM (Bryan 310)
Correll, Allison Moore
 
054 - Writing about the Arts
MW 03:00PM-04:15PM (Bryan 330)
Lucy Catlett
 
055 - Writing about Culture/Society
MWF 09:00AM-09:50AM (Bryan 312)
Instructor TBD
 
056 - Writing about Culture/Society - Writing about the Future
MWF 11:00AM-11:50AM (Bryan 310)
Jeddie Sophronius

Pandemics, wars, rising sea levels, recession, metaverse—the world as we know it has been forever changed. What will remain, what will be obsolete? What autonomy do we have as individuals in a society where hyper-surveillance is the norm? What will the world look like when the world’s fossil fuel reserves run out in just a few decades? What will happen once all the corrals in oceans turn to stones? When the bees all die out? Have we destroyed our planet to the extent that it is unrepairable? Will metaverse be the new society?

The focus of this course revolves around the understanding of key factors that are shaping our future and finding the roles we have to play to ensure we have the future that we want. Throughout the semester, we will keep up with international news that ranges from politics, the economy, to science and technologies that have the potential to impact many people's lives, be it for the better or worse. We will extensively read and watch speculative fiction and social commentary pieces.

 
057 - Writing about Culture/Society - Writing about the Future
MWF 01:00PM-01:50PM (Bryan 312)
Jeddie Sophronius

Pandemics, wars, rising sea levels, recession, metaverse—the world as we know it has been forever changed. What will remain, what will be obsolete? What autonomy do we have as individuals in a society where hyper-surveillance is the norm? What will the world look like when the world’s fossil fuel reserves run out in just a few decades? What will happen once all the corrals in oceans turn to stones? When the bees all die out? Have we destroyed our planet to the extent that it is unrepairable? Will metaverse be the new society?

The focus of this course revolves around the understanding of key factors that are shaping our future and finding the roles we have to play to ensure we have the future that we want. Throughout the semester, we will keep up with international news that ranges from politics, the economy, to science and technologies that have the potential to impact many people's lives, be it for the better or worse. We will extensively read and watch speculative fiction and social commentary pieces.

 
058 - Writing about Culture/Society
TR 09:30AM-10:45AM (Bryan 332)
Casey Ireland
 
059 - Writing about Culture/Society
MWF 10:00AM-10:50AM (Bryan 310)
Jeddie Sophronius
 
060 - Writing about Science & Technology
TR 09:30AM-10:45AM (New Cabell 068)
Margaret Marangione
 
061 - Writing about the Arts
TR 09:30AM-10:45AM (Bryan 334)
Jason Nabi
 
062 - Writing about Culture/Society - Our Lives of Stuff
TR 09:30AM-10:45AM (Bryan 330)
Katherine James
 
064 - Writing about Culture/Society
MWF 11:00AM-11:50AM (Bryan 330)
Instructor TBD
 
065 - Writing about Culture/Society - Writing and Reflecting on Society Through the Horror Genre
TR 08:00AM-09:15AM (Monroe 114)
Kaylin Preslar
 
066 - Writing about Culture/Society
TR 05:00PM-06:15PM (New Cabell 407)
Jordan Norviel
 
067 - Writing about Culture/Society
MW 05:00PM-06:15PM (Bryan 332)
Quenby Hersh
 
068 - Writing about Digital Media
MWF 09:00AM-09:50AM (Bryan 330)
Ankita Chakrabarti
 
069 - Writing about Culture/Society - Our Lives of Stuff
TR 11:00AM-12:15PM (Bryan 312)
Katherine James
 
070 - Writing about the Arts
TR 02:00PM-03:15PM (New Cabell 044)
Gahl Pratt Pardes
 
071 - Writing about Culture/Society
MW 05:00PM-06:15PM (Bryan 330)
Jacob Nash Francis
 
072 - Writing about Culture/Society - Through Monstrosity
TR 05:00PM-06:15PM (Bryan 334)
Hyeona Park
 
073 - Writing about Culture/Society
TR 03:30PM-04:45PM (New Cabell 287)
John T. Casteen IV
 
074 - Writing about Identities
MWF 11:00AM-11:50AM (Bryan 332)
devin donovan
 
075 - Writing about the Arts - Films of the Pandemic
MW 05:00PM-06:15PM (Bryan 334)
Henry Tschurr
 
076 - Writing about the Arts
TR 12:30PM-01:45PM (Bryan 334)
Charity Fowler
 
077 - Writing about Science & Tech
MWF 11:00AM-11:50AM (New Cabell 283)
Heidi Nobles
 
078 - Writing about Culture/Society
TR 02:00PM-03:15PM (New Cabell 056)
Keith Driver
 
080 - Writing about the Arts - Other Worlds: Fantasy and Escapism in Fiction, Film, and TV
MWF 09:00AM-09:50AM (New Cabell 036)
Viola Cozzio
 
081 - Writing about the Arts
MWF 02:00PM-02:50PM (Bryan 310)
Hodges Adams

What does good writing actually look like? How is it made? This class focuses on the process of writing and revising. Students will consider a variety of mediums, from novels to poetry to essays to visual art, in an attempt to understand both how art is made and how it can teach them about their own capabilities and possibilities as writers. Student papers will be peer reviewed and revised multiple times during class. There will also be class trips to the Special Collections Library, the Memorial to the Enslaved Laborers and the Rotunda, Clemons Library, and the Fralin Museum of Art. 

082 - Writing about Culture/Society
TR 08:00AM-09:15AM (New Cabell 036)
Sean Murray

ENWR 1520 - Writing and Community Engagement (1 section)

001 - Writing and Community Engagement - Writing about Food Justice
TR 12:30PM-01:45PM (Bryan 203)
Kate Stephenson

ENWR 2510 - Advanced Writing Seminar (5 sections)

001 - Writing about Culture/Society
TR 02:00PM-03:15PM (Bryan 334)
Charity Fowler

003 - Writing about Science & Technology
MWF 12:00PM-12:50PM (Bryan 312)
Eric Rawson

005 - Writing about Culture/Society
TR 03:30PM-04:45PM (Bryan 310)
Kate Natishan

006 - Writing about Identities
MWF 11:00AM-11:50AM (New Cabell 107)
Rebecca Thomas

007 - Writing about Identities
MWF 01:00PM-01:50PM (Monroe 114)
Rebecca Thomas

ENWR 2520 - Special Topics in Writing (4 sections)

004 - Writing the Memorial to Enslaved Laborers at UVA
TR 03:30PM-04:45PM (Bryan 312)
Kate Kostelnik

In this writing course we’ll contribute to conversations of race and history at UVA through self-designed writing projects. The first part of the course will be an inquiry into the history of enslaved laborers at UVA and how the writers of the Declaration of Independence framed our country—particularly in terms of equality, individual liberty, and the institution of slavery— (texts: Danielle Allen’s Our Declaration, Sullivan’s Commission on Slavery and the University, excerpts from Nelson and Harold’s Charlottesville 2017, and excerpts from Nelson and McInnis’s Educated in Tyranny). Next, we will look at how writers speak back to silences and suppressed narratives (texts:  Colson Whitehead’s Underground Railroad, Petrosino’s White Blood, and Sharpe’s In the Wake). Throughout the course, we’ll look at current conversations about racial justice at UVA and beyond as well as community responses compiled by the Institute for Engagement and Negotiation[1] (IEN) in designing and executing the Memorial to Enslaved Laborers[2].

005 - Global Advocacy, Democracy, and Public Narrative
T 06:00PM-08:30PM (New Cabell 332)
Stephen Parks

006 - Visual Rhetoric & Scientific Images
MW 05:00PM-06:15PM (Bryan 203)
T. Kenny Fountain

In this course, we will examine the role visual representations and image-making technologies play in the development and communication of scientific and medical knowledge. Beginning with medieval European illustrations and ending with contemporary data visualizations, we will explore the ways scientific, technical, and medical images present phenomena, count as evidence, construct new forms of knowledge, and shape our conceptions of the world.

007 - Special Topics in Writing
TR 02:00PM-03:15PM (Bryan 312)
Kate Stephenson

ENWR 2610-001 - Writing with Style

TR 05:00PM-06:15PM (Bryan 312)
Keith Driver

ENWR 2700 - News Writing

No fake news here, but rather progressive exercises in developing the news-writing style of writing from straight hard news to "soft" features. Satisfies Second Writing Requirement.

TR 09:30AM-10:45AM (New Cabell 211)
Kate Sweeney

ENWR 2800 - Public Speaking

MW 03:30PM-04:45PM (New Cabell 191)
devin donovan

ENWR 3500 - Topics in Advanced Writing & Rhetoric (4 sections)

001 - Cultural Rhetorics
T 06:00PM-08:30PM (Wilson 244)
Tamika Carey

Every culture has its own way of making meaning and communicating through persuasive means. Native American groups, for instance, have retained ceremonial customs and spirituality practices despite the conquests that have shaped this country. Queer communities, for example, have strategic ways that they use to make sense of the world and joy for themselves in relation to heteronormativity. African-Americans, LatinX, and Asian Americans all have strategic language practices and social customs they use to fortify their collective identities and advocate for themselves amid historical hostility. Differently abled people have developed strategic ways of making their needs met despite design choices that disadvantage them. Individuals in this country’s working-class employ strategic techniques to advocate for themselves in challenging environments. This course will explore how these various cultural locations (e.g., race, ethnicity, gender, ability, sexuality) impact how people generate rhetorical practices to maintain community and resist social division. Our work will involve exploring a variety of contexts wherein these practices are made; learning methodologies for studying rhetorical production across media and modality; and tracking these practices and their historical developments. Ideally, this work will enrich how you understand and participate in real-world cross-cultural and intercultural communications in professional and public spheres as well as personal encounters. Projects are likely to include: a language and culture autobiography; a discussion leading presentation; an annotated bibliography and introduction; and a final project presentation.

003 - Book Editing & Publishing
MWF 12:00PM-12:50PM (New Cabell 064)
Heidi Nobles

004 - Democracy, Rights, & Advocacy
M 06:00PM-08:30PM (New Cabell 183)
Stephen Parks

005 - Environmental Justice Writing
TR 02:00PM-03:15PM (Bryan 330)
Cory Shaman

ENWR 3660-001 - Travel Writing

TR 09:30AM-10:45AM (Bryan 312)
Kate Stephenson

This course will explore travel writing using a variety of texts, including essays, memoirs, blogs, photo essays, and narratives. We will examine cultural representations of travel as well as the ethical implications of tourism. Students will have the opportunity to write about their own travel experiences, and we will also embark on "local travel" of our own.

ENWR 3740-001 - Black Women's Writing & Rhetoric

TR 03:30PM-04:45PM (New Cabell 107)
Tamika Carey

This course offers students a survey of the persuasive communication and writing strategies Black women have used towards the project of empowerment. We will explore how they use rhetoric as techne, or an art, to meet their needs, and to understand how rhetoric can be used as a tool of discernment to critique literature, communication, discourse, and evaluate arguments directed to them. Texts may include: Jacqueline Jones Royster’s Traces of a Stream: Literacy as Social Change Among African American Women, Brittany Cooper’s Eloquent Rage: A Black Feminist Discovers Her Superpower, Mikki Kendall’s Hood Feminism: Notes from the Women a Movement Forgot, and others. Projects are likely to include: a discussion leading presentation; an analytical essay, and a final project.

ENWR 3900-001 - Career-Based Writing/Rhetoric

MWF 01:00PM-01:50PM (Bryan 310)
Jon D'Errico

Develops proficiency in a range of stylistic and persuasive effects. The course is designed for students who want to hone their writing skills, as well as for students preparing for careers in which they will write documents for public circulation. Students explore recent research in writing studies. In the workshop-based studio sessions, students propose, write, and edit projects of their own design.